Relationships, Both Family & more

Create a topic of your own that links in to the readings this week and that includes some reference to your own personal experience.

After Reading Patrick Whites “Down in the Dumps”, discuss different relationships shown within the story.

Relationships, we all have them and most times, it doesn’t revolve around intimacy. Whether we define it or not, we all have a connection to another individual one way or another. It can also mean family, friends or even those who you work with. After reading Patrick Whites “Down in the Dumps” I have identified the different relationships between characters, including the differences and the similarities in all that have been identified.

One of the main relationships that I found while reading this text was the negativity within the connection between Myrtle (Mrs Hogben) & her daughter, Meg. The differences between the personalities, individually, highlight a negative clash between the way they connect on a family basis. Myrtle herself is identified as a strict and pessimistic individual. As the relationship between her and her daughter is not as strong as the viewers believe it should be, the relationship between Mrs Hogben & Myrtle can be suggested to be due to Myrtle’s personal self-centred personality, affecting the way Meg sees her own mother as a potential role model.

The relationship however between Meg and her aunt Daise (Myrtle’s Sister) is stronger, in comparison to the relationship between Mrs Hogben & Meg. As both characters have the same personality traits they are able to connect more. As they are both free minded and optimistic, Daise is able to be free spirited when she is with her niece, resulting in a more positive connection. Because of the similar personality traits that both characters portray, this allows Meg to open up to her aunty, appreciating Daise as she has everything that Meg wants; freedom and independence.

Another main relationship that is shown within White’s “Down in the Dumps” is the intimate relationship present between Daise and her potential lover, Ossie. Although the story is set during Daise’s funeral, the characters reflect on their contribution to her life. In Ossie’s case, the relationship he had with Daise was full of lust and intimacy. However, due to the type of relationship they had, Ossie had started to develop personal feelings for her, believing it was just more than just the regular ‘one night stands’. Seeing her as calming & nurturing, it is easily understandable for the us viewers to be able to justify the reasoning of this particular character’s sorrow of loss to be a personal tragedy, that will take a while for him to recover from.

The impact of relationships between people can be for the better, or for the worst. Whether it is intimate, family or work, relationships allow us to have a sense of connection in the world. It is an aspect of life in which we all utilise to comfort our own emotional and social status.

 

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4 thoughts on “Relationships, Both Family & more

  1. cagobravo says:

    Hey Joshua,

    first of all thank you for your good and constructive comment on my last post.

    You did a very good job in summarising the relations in Patrick Whites “Down in the Dumps”. I totally agree that we all need some kind of relations as human beings – one way or another.

    One thing I can say about your blog is rather something visual. For me it was kind of hard to read the grey writing on the black background but anyway still possible.

    Cheers,

    Carlos

    Like

  2. natashahartblog says:

    Joshua took the leap of creating one of his own topics for this entry, analysing the relationships in Patrick White’s “Down in the Dumps”. He makes the points of assessing the relationships between Meg and her mother, Meg and her aunt, and Daise and Ossie, making in my eyes the right assumptions on all three. His ideas are clearly presented and straight to the point. He took the risk writing his own topic and I believe he wen brilliantly in his execution of it.

    Like

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